Grant McCracken's series of case studies on American culture have been eminently interesting and entertaining, and like a good novel I've been limiting myself to one a day even though a blob of them dropped a few days ago. Today's read, on platforms for producer creativity struck a chord with me...

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Flirting with "truth"

Very strange to read an interview with Martie Haselton of UCLA days after reading in The Economist that The idea that women are cyclical cuckolders bites the dust. Why? Because Martie Haselton says:

The work from my lab is best known for doing rigorous studies of changes across women’s ovu...

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As an editor, one of my triggers is phrases of the form "I work for the elimination of ambiguity". I shun them. I prefer to work to eliminate ambiguity. I do so because "it's a fact the whole world knows" that nounifications are harder to understand.

Now I read, in The Economist, that "presenting ... statements in noun form" -- I support the division -- "reduced feelings of anger" compared to the verb form -- I support dividing.

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The Main Squeeze had a slightly spooky moment when she opened her Instagram app this morning. Last night, she'd been noodling around looking for a holiday place to stay. Now, near the top of her stream, there was the exact same place she had spent most time looking at, in a "sponsored" post.

We ha...

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A time to remember

I'm remembering a night at my grandparents' flat 60 or 61 years ago. It was a special occasion, a holiday, and the table was beautifully set, with white linen, flickering candles, glittering glass and silver. As the youngest son at the table. I had a special part to play. I did it, though I have no recollection whether well, and afterwards my grandfather handed me a small box. My first wristwatch. I remember nothing about that either, except that I proudly put it on my left wrist, as he had told me I should.

Little did I know, it was a trap.

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