Scicomm; what is it good for?

Absolutely nuthin

A few days ago, searching for something completely different, I came across a post by John Hawks -- The futility of science communication conferences -- which I duly bookmarked. The real point of that, of course, was to remind myself to go and read the foundation post: Communication, Literacy, Policy: Thoughts on SciComm in a Democracy, by Rick Borchelt.1 It's a beaut, and not just because it pushes all my confirmation bias buttons.

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Ooops

Continuing my efforts to bring old stuff into this new bottle, I came across a post from 3 January 2006.

my favourite list of 2005: The Year in Media Errors and Corrections. The parent site looks worth bookmarking for future entertainment.

Alas, Wayback Machine knows it not. At least the l...

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Bird migration: getting to the point

History is written by the winners

It was fun listening to Melvyn Bragg trying to get to grips with the ineffable mysteries of bird migration. The facts don't seem to have changed much since I taught the subject, decades ago,1 although there are now many more of them. And almost all of those facts are clearly enough to make even Lord Bragg's mind boggle, as we heard throughout the show. But I kept waiting for one of the guests to make one key point.

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Michael Chabon is one of a couple of living authors whose words -- any words -- I fall upon with glee. Right now I'm working my way slowly through Manhood for Amateurs. Slowly both because these essays are so good that I don't want them to end and because they do also blend into one another, the most recently finished tending to obscure earlier ones.

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Set my photos free

Breaking down the silo walls

I've moaned publicly and to anyone who'll listen about how much I hate the way Instagram now shows me photos from the people I follow. Hating's not enough, though. You have to do something about it.

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